EBSCO: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books: Using the System

Part Three in a Four Part Series.

The EBSCOhost Index of Legal Periodicals and Books (ILP) provides a comprehensive way to find sources on important legal topics. This blawg will show the different tools available once a search term has been entered.

On the home page, I placed “American Indian Law” in the search box and limited the sources to periodicals. The ILP search results provided a lot of potential sources.

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On the left side of the page, there was a box showing the current search and also a way to limit the sources further. Each result also showed if there was a link the full PDF, a way to find it, or a way to request the source.

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Once a source is selected, ILP provides many useful tools. There is an abstract, subject words, and an easy access way to download the PDF.

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If ILP has the PDF, there is a myriad of tools to use within the PDF itself. For example, there is a tool to manage the table of contents and a way to print, email, or save the source.

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Access to EBSCOhost: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

 

EBSCOhost:

http://eds.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/search/basic?sid=b159672d-eb1e-495c-9c8c-ccdc48b22e89%40sessionmgr4008&vid=7&hid=4202

 

May 2017 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout May 2017, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is the compilation of daily alerts for May 1, 2017 to May 31, 2017.

Published:
1. John L. Watts, A Confused Sea: Vicarious Liability for Punitive Damages Under Maritime Law, 91 TUL. L. REV. 691 (2017).

2. Gerry W. Beyer, Recent Developments from the Texas Courts, EST. PLAN. DEV. FOR TEX. PROF., Apr. 2017, at 1.

3. Gerry W. Beyer, Keeping Current—Probate, 31-June PROB. & PROP. 29 (2017).

4. Gerry W. Beyer, America’s Next Top Probate Model, JOTWELL (May 5,2017) (reviewing Katherine M. Arango, Trials and Heirs: Antemortem Probate for the Changing American Family, 81 BROOK. L. REV. 779 (2016)), http://trustest.jotwell.com/americas-next-top-probate-model/.

5. Brie D. Sherwin, Pride and Prejudice and Administrative Zombies: How Economic Woes, Outdated Environmental Regulations, and State Exceptionalism Failed Flint, Michigan, 88 U. COLO. L. REV. 653 (2017).

6. William R. Casto, The Abiding Importance of Procrastination: In Grading Law School Final Examinations, 20 GREEN BAG 2d 235 (2017).

7. Richard W. Murphy, Reviving and Refining a Pragmatic Approach to Finality, JOTWELL (April 17, 2017) (reviewing William Funk, Final Agency Action After Hawkes, 11 N.Y.U. J. L. & LIBERTY (forthcoming 2017), available at SSRN), http://adlaw.jotwell.com/reviving-and-refining-a-pragmatic approach-to-finality/.

Cited:
1. Prof. Beyer’s article Statutory Fill-in Will Forms–the First Decade: Theoretical Constructs and Empirical Findings was cited in the following article: Mark Glover, Freedom of Inheritance, 2017 UTAH L. REV. 283 (2017).

2. Prof. Camp’s article The Play’s the Thing: A Theory of Taxing Virtual Worlds was cited in the following note: Zachary B. Johnson, I Got 988 Problems but Bitcoin Ain’t One: The Current Problems Presented by the Internal Revenue Service’s Guidance on Virtual Currency, 47 U. MEM. L. REV. 633 (2016).

3. Prof. Camp’s article A History of Tax Regulation Prior to the Administrative Procedure Act was cited in the following article: Brian Boyd, State v. Saldierna, 61 N.Y.L. SCH. L. REV. 175 (2017).

4. Prof. Camp’s article Theory & Practice in Tax Administration was cited in the American Bar Association’s comments on recent practice changes at the Internal Revenue Service Appeals Division: William Caudill, ABA Members Comment on Recent Appeals Division Practice Changes (Section 1014 — Basis of property acquired from a decedent), 2017 TNT 89-10.

5. Prof. Camp’s article The Failure of Adversarial Process in the Administrative State was cited in the following article: Michael Asimow & Yoav Dotan, Open and Closed Judicial Review of Agency Action: The Conflicting U.S. and Israeli Approaches, 64 AM. J. COMP. L. 521 (2016).

6. Prof. Casto’s book Foreign Affairs and the Constitution in the Age of Fighting Sail was cited in the following article: John L. Watts, A Confused Sea: Vicarious Liability for Punitive Damages Under Maritime Law, 91 TUL. L. REV. 691 (2017).

7. Prof. Casto’s article Attorney General Robert Jackson’s Brief Encounter with the Notion of Preclusive Presidential Power was cited in the following article: Zivotofsky II and National Security Decisionmaking at the Lowest Ebb, 66 DUKE L.J. 1599 (2017).

8. Prof. Casto’s article The ATS Cause of Action Is Sui Generis was cited in the following article: Anonymous, Clarifying Kiobel’s “Touch and Concern” Test, 130 HARV. L. REV. 1902 (2017).

9. Prof. Casto’s article Foreign Affairs and the Constitution in the Age of Fighting Sail was cited in the fighting article: Alex H. Loomis, The Power to Define Offenses Against the Law of Nations, 40 HARV. J.L. & PUB. POL’Y 417 (2017).

10. Prof. Humphrey’s article ‘‘Let’s Talk About Sex”: Legislating and Educating on the Affirmative Consent Standard was cited in the following article: Professor Andrea A. Curcio, Institutional Failure, Campus Sexual Assault and Danger in the Dorms: Regulatory Limits and the Promise of Tort Law, 78 MONT. L. REV. 31 (2017).

11. Prof. Humphrey’s article ‘‘Let’s Talk About Sex”: Legislating and Educating on the Affirmative Consent Standard was cited in the following article: Eleanor Murphy, No Means No: A Critical Examination of the Effectiveness of the “Yes Means Yes” Law, 39 T. JEFFERSON L. REV. 93 (2017).

12. Prof. Metze’s article Speaking Truth to Power: The Obligation of the Courts to Enforce the Right to Counsel at Trial was cited in the following article:
Paul George, The Cost of Ab 193: Constitutional Guarantees Sacrificed for Ineffective Means, 17 NEV. L.J. 517 (2017).

13. Prof. Murphy’s article Chenery Unmasked: Reasonable Limits on the Duty to Give Reasons was cited in the following article: Michael Asimow &Yoav Dotan, Open and Closed Judicial Review of Agency Action: The Conflicting U.S. and Israeli Approaches, 64 AM. J. COMP. L. 521 (2016).

14. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s article #HAVEWEREALLYTHOUGHTTHISTHROUGH?: Why Granting Trademark Protection to Hashtags Is Unnecessary, Duplicative, and Downright Dangerous was cited in the following article: Stacey B. Steinberg, #advocacy: Social Media Activism’s Power to Transform Law, 105 KY. L.J. 413 (2017).

15. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s article #HAVEWEREALLYTHOUGHTTHISTHROUGH?: Why Granting Trademark Protection to Hashtags Is Unnecessary, Duplicative, and Downright Dangerous was cited in the following article: Debbie Chu, #CautionBusinesses: Using Competitors’ Hashtags Could Possibly Lead to Trademark Infringement, 25 CATH. U. J. L. & TECH 387 (2017).

16. Prof. Weninger’s article The Abolition of Plea Bargaining: A Case Study of El Paso County, Texas was cited in the following article: Eric S. Fish, Prosecutorial Constitutionalism, 90 S. CAL. L. REV. 237 (2017).

17. Prof. Batra’s article Judicial Participation in Plea Bargaining: A Dispute Resolution Perspective was cited in the following article: Eric S. Fish, Prosecutorial Constitutionalism, 90 S. CAL. L. REV. 237 (2017).

18. Many of Prof. Beyer’s past articles and studies were cited in the following article: Jacob Arthur Bradley, Antemortem Probate Is A Bad Idea: Why Antemortem Probate Will Not Work and Should Not Work, 85 MISS. L.J. 1431 (2017).

19. Prof. James’s article No Help for the Helpless: How the Law Has Failed to Serve and Protect Persons Suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease was cited in the following article: Roy G. Spece Jr. et al., (Implicit) Consent to Intimacy, 50 IND. L. REV. 907 (2017).

20. Prof. Sutton’s article Environment and Public Health in a Time of Plague was cited in the following article: Christopher Ogolla, First Do No Harm: The Manipulation of Public Health for Non-Public Health Purposes and Its Legal Consequences, 50 IND. L. REV. 849 (2017).

21. Prof. Spain’s article Collaborative Law: A Critical Reflection on Whether a Collaborative Orientation Can Be Ethically Incorporated into the Practice of Law was cited in the following article: Rachel Rebouché, A Case Against Collaboration, 76 MD. L. REV. 547 (2017).

22. Prof. Weninger’s article Amended Federal Rule of Evidence 408: Trapping the Unwary was cited as a principal law review article for understanding Rule of Evidence 408 in § 408.12 Law review articles and other commentary on Rule 408, 5A WASH. PRAC., EVIDENCE LAW AND PRACTICE § 408.12 (6th ed.), a June 2017 update to the Washington Practice Series.

23. Prof. Watts’s article Fairness and Utility in Products Liability: Balancing Individual Rights and Social Welfare was cited in the following article: A. Mayer Kohn, A World After Tincher v. Omega Flex: Pennsylvania Courts Should Preclude Industry Standards and Practices Evidence in Strict Products Liability Litigation, 89 TEMP. L. REV. 643 (2017).

24. Prof. Watts’s article Differences without Distinctions: Boyle’s Government Contractor Defense Fails to Recognize the Critical Differences Between Civilian and Military Plaintiffs and Between Military and Non-Military Procurement was cited in the following treatise: Dan B. Dobbs, Paul T. Hayden & Ellen M. Bublick, The Law of Torts § 352 (2d ed. 2017).

25. Prof. Beyer and William R. Buckley’s article Videotape and the Probate Process, the Nexus Grows was cited in the following treatise: Eunice L. Ross and Thomas J. Reed, Will Contests § 14:14 (2d ed. 2017).

Quoted:
1. Prof. Huffman’s article Margin of Error: Potential Pitfalls of the Ruling in the Prosecutor v. Ante Gotovina was quoted in the following article: Mark “Max” Maxwell & Richard V. Meyer, The Innocent Combatant: Preserving Their Jus in Bello Protections, 5 PENN ST. J.L. & INT’L AFF. 111 (2017).

News:
1. As the 2015 winner of the Gardener DeMallie Award for the highest rated speaker at the Douglas W. Conner 36th Annual Advanced Estate Planning and Administration Seminar, Prof. Beyer was invited to return to Williamsburg, Virginia speak at the 38th Annual Program on May 6, 2017. To an audience of over 200 estate planning attorneys, Prof. Beyer presented his paper entitled Anticipating Wills Contests and How to Avoid Them.

2. Prof. Brian Shannon addressed the Lubbock Area Bar Association’s monthly meeting on May 10, 2017, on the topic, “NCAA Litigation & Legislation: They are Student-Athletes, Right?”

3. Prof. Brian Shannon served as the Master of Ceremonies at the Newton Excellence in Education 2017 Award Gala in Lubbock, Texas, on May 10, 2017.

4. Prof. Beyer presented six hours of continuing education for the Texas Association of Counties’ 2017 Probate Academy held in Lubbock, Texas on May 10-11 with approximately 120 Constitutional County Court judges and their clerks in attendance. The topics Prof. Beyer covered included: a probate legislative update, types of wills and what makes a will, an appellate case update, intestacy issues and property passage, digital assets – planning and administration, multiple-party bank accounts, regular and NFA weapons, and a probate question and answer session.

5. On May 12, Prof. Beyer traveled to Amarillo, Texas to serve as a speaker for the Twenty-Sixth Annual Institute on Estate Planning sponsored by the Amarillo Area Estate Planning Council. Prof. Beyer’s presentations and accompanying papers were as follows: Transfer on Death Deeds, Cyber Estate Planning and Administration, and Estate Planning for “Weaponized” Clients.

6. Prof. Baker’s efforts to combat SCOTUS link rot were recognized in 22 NO. 4 INTERNET L. RESEARCHER NL 5 (2017).

7. Prof. Bryan Camp was interviewed for and quoted in the following article: Marie Sapirie, No Equitable Tolling for Late-Filed Innocent Spouse Petition, 2017 TXN MAGAZINE 20-16.

8. On May 17, Prof. Beyer was the guest speaker at a meeting of the Estate Planning Council of North Texas in Plano, Texas. His presentation was entitled Estate Planning & Administration for Digital Assets and Guns and was accompanied by his two articles: (1) Cyber Estate Planning and Administration and (2) Estate Planning for “Weaponized” Clients.

9. On May 18, Prof. Beyer was the guest speaker at a meeting of the Houston Area Disability Elder Law Attorney Association. His topic and accompanying paper were entitled Morals from the Courthouse: A Study of Recent Texas Cases Impacting the Wills, Probate, and Trust Practice.

10. On May 30, Prof. Beyer was the guest speaker for a meeting of the Probate, Trusts, and Estates Section of the Houston Bar Association. His presentation and accompanying article were entitled Avoiding the Estate Planning “Blue Screen of Death” with Competent and Ethical Practices.

11. Prof. Vickie Sutton was interviewed in the following article: Michael Todd, Scared Straight: Evidence Makes for Better Biosecurity Rules (2016). The article can be found here.

12. Prof. Huffman was interviewed in the following article: Matt Dotray, Lubbock at the doorstep in getting new VA super clinic, LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNAL, May 20, 2017, available at 2017 WL 15752799.

May 2017 New Books

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In May 2017, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

COURTS

  1. Hoffer, Peter Charles, The Federal Courts: An Essential History (2016).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

  1. Norwood, Doug, Constructive Possession in Criminal Law (2017).

DISPUTE RESOLUTION

  1. Frenkel, Douglas, The Practice of Mediation: A Video-Integrated Text (2012).

ENERGY AND UTILITIES LAW

  1. Dernbach, John C., Shale Gas and the Future of Energy: Law and Policy for Sustainability (2016).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  1. Barnett, Cynthia, Rain: A Natural and Cultural History (2015).

IMMIGRATION LAW

  1. Wheeler, Charles, Immigration Law and the Family: A Practical Guide to Family-Sponsored Immigration, (2013).

LAND USE

  1. Korngold, Gerald, Private Land Use Arrangements: Easements, Real Covenants and Equitable Servitudes (2016).

LAW AND SOCIETY

  1. Friedman, Lawrence M., Impact: How Law Affects Behavior (2016).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

  1. Cupples, Deborah E., Grammar, Punctuation & Style: A Quick Guide for Lawyers and Other Writers (2013).

LEGAL PROFESSION

  1. Siskind, Gregory H., The Lawyer’s Guide to Marketing on the Internet (2017).
  2. Allen, Jeffrey, Technology Tips for Lawyers and Other Business Professionals (2016).

POLITICS

  1. Downey, Arthur T., The Cold War: Law, Lawyers, Spies, and Crises (2016).

PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY

  1. Singh, Lilly, How to be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life (2017).

REPRODUCTION

  1. Mason, Mary Ann, Babies of Technology: Assisted Reproduction and the Rights of the Child (2017).
  2. Wilson, Joshua C., The New States of Abortion Politics (2016).

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

  1. Johnson, Timothy Russell, Oral Arguments and Decision Making on the United States Supreme Court (2004).
  2. Forsythe, Clarke D., Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade (2013).

WATER LAW

  1. Kidd, Michael, Water and the Law: Towards Sustainability (2014).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.

Bloomberg Law: Litigation Analytics – What is it?

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This is the first of a four part series spotlighting Bloomberg Law’s Litigation Analytics.

Bloomberg Law’s Litigation Analytics is a newly developed tool that allows a user to search current litigation statistics by firm, by represented client, or by judge. It contains dynamic charts for the user to interact with.

To access this feature, you will need your Bloomberg Law login. After logging in, you will click on the litigation and dockets tab at the top of the page. Under Litigation and Dockets, select Litigation Analytics.

This is the starting homepage, displayed is an example of search by company, specifically Apple Inc.

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This is an excellent tool to research all kinds of litigation, such as what firms are currently representing some of your clients in another jurisdiction, which firm represents an opposing party, the frequency of appearances for each firm, and what judges are hearing these cases. Data is downloadable into PDF, Word, and Excel Reports. After you locate the data that you need, click on the printer icon on the right hand side, then this window will pop up with a variety of options.

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To begin, you will want to select what type of party you are searching at the top. This will either be company, law firm or judge.

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For more general information about the resource, visit https://www.bna.com/litigation-analytics/.

Access to the Bloomberg Law database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

EBSCO: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books: Folders

Part Four in a Four Part Series.

The EBSCOhost Index to Legal Periodicals and Books (ILP) also allows users to save searches and materials to folders. When a specific source is open that a user wants to save, the folder button is located on the right side of the screen.

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A user can access the folder at any point during the search as it is located on the blue search bar at the top of the page.

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The folder automatically places sources into different sections based on the type of source. In addition, the ILP Folder also stores search alerts and journal alerts.

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Finally, the ILP Folder is easy to manage with tools to print, email, and delete sources.

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Overall, the ILP is a very useful tool to find periodical and books sources on a variety of legal topics. It is easy-to-use and well-organized.

Access to EBSCOhost: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

EBSCOhost:
http://eds.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/search/basic?sid=b159672d-eb1e-495c-9c8c-ccdc48b22e89%40sessionmgr4008&vid=7&hid=4202

 

EBSCO: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books: Search Bar

Part Two in a Four Part Series.

The EBSCOhost Index to Legal Periodicals and Books (ILP) also has a very useful Search Bar at the top of the search box.

blue barOne the left side, the ILP provides a New Search tab that takes a user back to the home page. There is also a Publications tab that provides access to an alphabetical publication database. Finally, there is a Thesaurus tab which provides a search tool based on the different legal meaning of terms.

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On the right side there are useful tabs, such as the Preferences, which allows a user to set up the presentation of the searched material.

preferences

There is also a Languages tab and an Ask a Librarian tab which takes users to the Tech Law website to submit a question.

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Access to EBSCOhost: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

EBSCOhost:
http://eds.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/search/basic?sid=b159672d-eb1e-495c-9c8c-ccdc48b22e89%40sessionmgr4008&vid=7&hid=4202

 

EBSCO: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books: Overview

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Part One in a Four Part Series.

The Index to Legal Periodicals and Books (ILP), an EBSCOhost search tool, provides a comprehensive approach to finding online book and periodical materials. This tool provides multiple ways of narrowing and developing search parameters.homeILP provides a useful search bar. There are also helpful search options, such as Advanced Search and Search History. There is also a tool that will limit the database based on subject.

search bar

ILP also provides a Search Options mode that has search modes and expanders that are helpful. Further, there is tool to limit a search based on publication type, date, full text link, and publication date.

search options

Overall, ILP is a very helpful tool to access several article and books in an easy-to-use manner. It is user friendly and contains many sources.

Access to EBSCOhost: Index to Legal Periodicals and Books database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

EBSCOhost:

http://eds.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/search/basic?sid=b159672d-eb1e-495c-9c8c-ccdc48b22e89%40sessionmgr4008&vid=7&hid=4202

 

“Excuse Me, Can I Have a Turn?” Female SCOTUS Justices Heavily Interrupted

The Harvard Business Review recently released the results of an enlightening new study about the speech patterns during SCOTUS oral arguments.

According to the article, a new empirical study shows that the male justices interrupt the female justices approximately three times as often as they interrupt each other during oral arguments. 

640px-Sotomayor,_Ginsburg,_and_Kagan_10-1-2010HBR examined the transcripts of 15 years of Supreme Court oral arguments, finding that women do not have an equal opportunity to be heard on the highest court in the land. In fact, as more women join the court, the reaction of the male justices has been to increase their interruptions of the female justices. Many male justices are now interrupting female justices at double-digit rates per term, but the reverse is almost never true. In the last 12 years, during which women made up, on average, 24% of the bench, 32% of interruptions were of the female justices, but only 4% were by the female justices.

And there is a consistently gendered pattern: In 1990, with one woman on the bench (former Justice Sandra Day O’Connor), 35.7% of interruptions were directed at her; in 2002, 45.3% were directed at the two female justices (O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg); in 2015, 65.9% of all interruptions on the court were directed at the three female justices on the bench (Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan). With more women on the court, the situation only seems to be getting worse.

Not only do the fellow male justices interrupt the female justices, so too do the male advocates on the other side of the bench. Despite strict rules mandating that advocates stop talking immediately when a justice begins speaking, interruptions by male advocates account for approximately 10% of all interruptions that occur in court. In contrast, interruptions by female advocates account for approximately 0%. 

While the female justices are being interrupted at far higher rates, at least they are learning to stop using polite prefatory words. Early in their tenure, female justices tend to frame questions politely, using prefatory words such as “May I ask,” “Can I ask,” “Excuse me,” or the advocate’s name. 

HBR ultimately found that women gradually learn to set aside such politeness. All four of the female justices have reduced their tendency to use this polite phrasing. Justice Sotomayor adjusted within just a few months. Justices O’Connor and Ginsburg gradually became less and less polite over decades on the court, eventually using the polite phrases approximately one-third as much as they did initially. Justice Kagan is still learning: She uses polite language more than twice as often as the average man, although half as often as she did in 2010.

Not surprisingly, HBR did not see a similar trend with the men, because male justices rarely use these polite speech patterns, even when they first enter the court. It is the women who adapt their speech patterns to match those of the men.

If it’s this bad for arguably some of the most powerful women in the world, imagine what it’s like for other women in the legal profession. We all need to be aware of this issue and do a better job of listening.

Part Four TexasBarCLE: Practice Tools

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This is the fourth part of a four part series highlighting: http://www.texasbarcle.com/CLE/Home.asp.

This post showcases the remaining practice tools that the TexasBarCLE website has to offer.

First, TexasBarCLE offers access to Casemaker & Fastcase with your bar membership. Access to both of these databases can be found on the left side of the homepage.

Upon selecting either database you will be prompted to login with your registered account. You can register using your Last Name and your Texas Bar Card Number. If you don’t have a current Texas Bar card number, you can still create an account at no cost, but your services may be limited.

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TexasBarCLE also provides access to the Law Practice Management Program of the State Bar of Texas. This is a useful tool for solo practitioners or small firms who need help starting and managing their practice.

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Additionally, TexasBarCLE has a tab for Texas Supreme Court Oral Arguments & Meetings. This practice tool allows you to watch the Texas Supreme Court while it is in session through live or archived videos. You can search recent oral arguments, meetings, and upcoming events.

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Lastly, TexasBarCLE connects you with TYLA’s Ten Minute Mentor resource. TMM is a collection of online video presentations from lawyers in their areas of expertise. Each video is around ten minutes or less and is free.

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TexasBarCLE.com is a great resource for law students and attorneys of all ages. Make sure to take advantage of all the tools your state bar provides and consider the variety of available formats when completing your MCLE credit hours.

TexasBarCLE is available through the State Bar of Texas website and at http://www.texasbarcle.com.

April 2017 – New Books List

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In April 2017, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

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CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, GENERALLY

  1. Zoltan Balazsan, The Principle of the Separation of Powers: a Defense (2016).
  2. Gary Lawson, “A Great Power of Attorney”: Understanding the Fiduciary Constitution (2017).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

  1. James Forman, Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America (2017).

CYBER LAW

  1. Kevin F. Steinmetz, Hacked: A Radical Approach to Hacker Culture and Crime (2016).
  2. Daniel B. Garrie, Law Firm Cybersecurity (2017).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  1. Albert I. Telsey, The ABCs of Environmental Regulation (2016).

FIRST AMENDMENT

  1. Randy Bobbitt, Free Speech on America’s K-12 and College Campuses: Legal Cases from Barnette to Blaine, (2017).

HEALTH LAW AND POLICY

  1. Daniel Sledge, Health Divided: Public Health and Individual Medicine in the Making of the Modern American State (2017).

HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

  1. Stephen A. Simon, The U.S. Supreme Court and the Domestic Force of International Human Rights Law (2016).

INDIAN AND ABORIGINAL LAW

  1. David E. Wilkins, Dismembered: Native Disenrollment and the Battle for Human Rights (2017).

INTERNATIONAL LAW

  1. Thomas Alan Lund, The Creation of the Common Law: The Medieval “Year Books” Deciphered (2015).
  2. John Eaton, Finding English Law: Quick Access to Key Titles (2017).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

  1. Elizabeth Fajans, Scholarly Writing for Law Students: Seminar Papers, Law Review Notes and Law Review Competition Papers (2017).

LEGAL HISTORY

  1. Brian Tierney, Liberty and Law: The Idea of Permissive Natural Law, 1100-1800 (2014).

LEGAL PROFESSION

  1. Heidi K. Gardner, Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos (2016).
  2. Stephen R. Covey, First Things First: To Live, to Love, to Learn, to Leave a Legacy (1994)(2003 ed.).
  3. Jonathan McDowell, From Law School to Lawyer: Tools, Procedures, and Steps to Grow Your Practice (2015).

LEGAL RESEARCH AND LIBRARIES

  1. Jessie Daniels, Being a Scholar in the Digital Era: Transforming Scholarly Practice for the Public Good (2016).
  2. Andy Tattersall, Altmetrics: a practical guide for librarians, researchers and academics (2016).

MILITARY, WAR, AND PEACE

  1. Michael N. Schmitt (ed.), Tallinn Manual 2.0 on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Operations (2017).

PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

  1. Bob Ward, The Most Interesting Mock Trial Case Files in the World (2016).
  2. Glenn C. Altschuler, Ten Great American Trials: Lessons in Advocacy (2016).

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS

  1. William H.F. Altman, The Guardians on Trial: The Reading Order of Plato’s Dialogues from Euthyphro to Phaedo (2016).
  2. Frank Anechiarico, Legal but Corrupt: A New Perspective on Public Ethics (2017).
  3. Amos N. Guiora, The Crime of Complicity: The Bystander in the Holocaust (2017).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.